Irx genes make cartilage cells act ‘oh so immature’

Arthritis, the leading cause of disability in the US, involves the loss of a special type of cartilage cell lining the joints. In a study appearing on the cover of the latest issue of Developmental Cell, first author Amjad Askary -- a Ph.D. student in ...

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New model for collecting high quality biospecimens for genomic analysis

A successful pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach for collecting healthy post-mortem blood and tissue samples from hundreds of donors for use in gene expression analysis. This new biospecimen collection platform, which relied on...

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Use of rarely appropriate angioplasty procedures declined sharply

The number of angioplasty procedures classified as rarely appropriate declined sharply between 2010 and 2014, as did the number of those performed on patients with non-acute conditions, according to a study published today in the Journal of the America...

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New study: Leading cause of blindness could be prevented or delayed

In a major scientific breakthrough, a drug used to treat Parkinson's and related diseases may be able to delay or prevent macular degeneration, the most common form of blindness among older Americans. The study, published in the American Journal of Med...

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Self-rated health predicts immune response to the common cold

It turns out that we may be the best forecasters of our own health.New research from Carnegie Mellon University psychologists shows that a simple self-rating of health accurately predicts susceptibility to the common cold in healthy adults aged 18-55 y...

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USC and Sangamo researchers advance genome editing of blood stem cells

Genome editing techniques for blood stem cells just got better, thanks to a team of researchers at USC and Sangamo BioSciences. In an upcoming study in Nature Biotechnology, co-first authors Colin M. Exline, Ph.D., from USC and Jianbin Wang, Ph.D., fro...

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SwRI scientists explain why moon rocks contain fewer volatiles than Earth’s

Scientists at Southwest Research Institute combined dynamical, thermal, and chemical models of the Moon's formation to explain the relative lack of volatile elements in lunar rocks. Lunar rocks closely resemble Earth rocks in many respects, but Moon ro...

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Flipping the switch to better see cancer cells at depths

Using a high-tech imaging method, a team of biomedical engineers at the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis was able to see individual, early-developing cancer cells deeper in tissue than ever before with the help of a novel protein from a bacterium.

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A warmer world will be a hazier one

Aerosols impact the environment by affecting air quality and alter the Earth's radiative balance by either scattering or absorbing sunlight to varying degrees. What impact does climate change, induced by greenhouse gases (GHGs), have on the aerosol bu...

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Many adults with severe mental illness not being screened for diabetes

Many patients in the California public mental health care system with severe mental illness, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, who were taking antipsychotic medications were not screened for diabetes despite a recommendation for annual screen...

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Loss of consciousness a marker of early brain injury in subarachnoid hemorrhage

Loss of consciousness is a common presenting symptom in patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to brain aneurysm. Corresponding author Stephan A. Mayer, M.D., of the Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, and coauthors suggest l...

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Nanobodies from camels enable the study of organ growth

Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have developed a new technique using nanobodies. Employing the so-called 'Morphotrap,' the distribution of the morphogen Dpp, which plays an important role in wing development, could be selective...

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A giant fullerene system inhibits the infection by an artificial Ebola virus

Using an artificial Ebola virus model, a European team coordinated by researchers of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid/IMDEA-Nanociencia has proved how a supermolecule -- constituted by 13 fullerenes -- has been able of inhibiting the virus infecti...

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